Posted tagged ‘sleep’

An Ergonomic Bed

October 30, 2012

Regularly there are new sleep products on the market. Just last week I saw one that really impressed me, so much so that I’d like to share. Rest assured, I have no affiliation with this company, financial or otherwise.

It is a new bed which was designed ergonomically so the body can be in a neutral side-lying position during sleep. There is a cut-away so that the lower arm is supported underneath the body, while the head and shoulders are supported above. In this position the spine is not twisted, as it commonly is when side-lying. The support system allows the shoulders to be in a neutral position also, instead of rolled inwards as commonly happens.

The mattress is wedge-shaped so that the head is elevated. There’s been some work showing that when the body is supine, edema can re-distribute and cause narrowing of the airway. That airway narrowing increases the risk of apnea.

The bed is made of foam, and when I first heard that my alarm bells went off. However, I’ve learned that they only use pure foam that has not been treated with the harmful chemicals found in some foam. There were no fumes evident in the store, either when first walking in or after spending time looking at the bed.

So many people have pain conditions which interrupt their sleep, and the improvements to their sleep are limited until the pain can be eliminated. This bed gives me hope for some of those pain patients

In the next weeks someone will be trying it out for me, and I post an update here after the test. If you’d like more information, you can find it on the inventors’ site http://www.squiresleep.com/

Curing Insomnia is Like Climbing a Mountain

June 20, 2012

Being unable to sleep can be very distressing, especially when it’s an acute episode. One analogy that works when I think about treating insomnia is that Curing Insomnia is Like Climbing a Mountain.

Think about going for a hike up a mountain to the scenic view from the peak. You look at the paths that lead to the top, and choose the one that’s best for you. Your choice is based on where you came from, your preferences (a long gradual climb, or a short steep one), and your other abilities or conditions. Once you choose your path you stick with it, knowing that if you switch to another path, that horizontal movement is not getting you any closer to the goal.

It’s helpful to think of curing insomnia in a similar way, that you look at the treatment options available to you, and choose the one that’s the best fit. Once you’ve selected the treatment you want, stick with it long enough for it to be effective. Sometimes when people are in an acute episode of insomnia it is tempting to try different treatments, each for a short time. What’s more effective is to give a reasonable trial of a treatment approach (several weeks or a month at least), before switching paths. Knowing that insomnia is cured one night at a time, bit by bit, just like climbing a mountain can help keep you calm and focused on the end goal.

Here’s to the view from the top, and the peaceful sleep at the end of the path!

Does a Hot Bath Help Sleep?

May 24, 2012

Many people ask me “Does a warm bath help sleep, or is that just a myth?” The research shows . . .

Yes, it seems to help somewhat. Medical research has investigated the impact of both baths and foot baths on sleep. One study in older people with sleep disturbance found that a 40 minute footbath at 41C decreased wakefulness in the second nonREM sleep period. Women undergoing chemotherapy for cancer have also found increased sleep quality with a warm footbath. Another study done in elderly insomniacs found that a full-body bath (immersed to the mid-chest) for 30 minutes at 40-41C did increase deep sleep, and caused people to experience a good night sleep. .

How does a warm bath improve sleep? Human body temperature is not constant, but varies with a consistent circadian rhythm.  There is a slight dip in body temperature at approximately 1pm, and then a more significant drop in the evening hours.  We get that sleepy feeling as our body temperature drops. The bath effectively raises our body temperature, and the subsequent drop helps sleep. The bath should be about 60-90 minutes before bedtime.

Of all the means you can use to improve your sleep, this one seems one of the most simple, with the least possible negative side effects. This is a good therapy to try first before using other, more invasive medicine.

Sleep Interruptions – Not so Trivial!

April 25, 2012

Many people talk to me about their difficulties sleeping, either difficulty falling asleep initially, or returning to sleep in the middle of the night, or in some cases waking up before they want to start the day.

One question that can be very helpful in this situation is “what woke you?” or “what prevented you from falling asleep?”  Surprisingly often, there is a clear environmental disturbance that is interrupting sleep.

Here are some of the external sleep interruptions I’ve heard of over the years:
– a snoring, or moving, bedpartner who may have a sleep disorder of their own
– bedpartner who gets into bed later, or who gets up earlier, thus waking up the person experiencing insomnia
– dog’s collar jingling
– cat asking for attention by scratching on the bedroom door
– outdoor lights that turn off and on with movement (hate those!)
– children in the bed, snuggled right up against the patient who then is uncomfortable
– an appliance or toy that beeps
– the cell phone, often a problem when it is used as an alarm clock
. . . and the list could easily go on.

When you are working to improve your sleep, you first want to eliminate as many of these interruptions as possible. I recently was working with a woman struggling to sleep well, waking 2-4 times each night. When asked “what wakes you in the night” she identified that sometimes her husband’s snoring woke her. We dialed down into that a little more, and she estimated that his loud snoring is responsible for half of her wakings, and realized looking back on it that when he’s away she does sleep better. Another person, a mother, said that she’s often squished between her children during sleep, and has no sleep problem if she has the bed to herself.

When you are working to improve your sleep, a helpful first step is to see if any external factor is interrupting or preventing you from sleep. Systematically resolve those interruptions, and then re-assess. You may find that those interruptions you were tolerating are not so trivial!

Start School Later – Contact your Senators!

April 20, 2012

Thanks to Terra Snider, Kari Oakes, and Mary King for delivering the Start School Later petition to our Washington State Senators Murry and Cantwell in person on Weds, April 18. This team is committing many hours to speak with congress people from around the country on this important issue. Now is the time for each of us to reach out and voice our support of this initiative with our state congress people. Please do so today!

Senator Patty Murray
448 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-2621
Fax: 202-224-0238
Toll Free: 866-481-9186
Email: Web Form: http://www.murray.senate.gov/email/index.cfm

Senator Maria Cantwell
311 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3441
Fax: 202-228-514
Toll Free: 888-648-7328
Email: HTTP://Cantwell.senate.gov

For those of you reading this in other states, you can learn more about this initiative at http://www.startschoollater.net. There is a tool to find the congress people for your zip code here: http://independenceave.org/. Please contact them now, as the Start School Later team is systematically contacting all the Congress and House of Representatives. Together we can make this important improvement for thousands of teens!

Sleepy Transportation Workers – Scary!

March 15, 2012

Last week was National Sleep Awareness Week, and the time each year that the annual Sleep in America Poll is unveiled. This year it is all about sleep health in the transportation industry. This data raises concerns about public safety, and the health of the transportation workers. Here’s what pilots, train operators, and professional drivers of all types reported about their sleep.

Sleepiness and Safety
When asked about sleepiness, 1 in 4 pilots and train operators said that sleepiness has impacted their job performance once a week. Even more concerning is the number of professionals who say that sleepiness caused safety issues: 20% of pilots, 18% of train operators, and 14% of truck drivers.

These safety issues persist during transportation employees personal time: 6% were in an auto accident due to sleepiness compared to 1% of those who work in other industries.

The Sleep Schedule
Almost half of transportation workers are dis-satisfied with their sleep. Many say their work schedule does not allow enough time for sleep (44% train operators, 37% pilots). This compares to 27% of non-transportation workers.

Transportation professionals tend to work longer shifts, with less time off between shifts. They also tend to have longer commute times, and irregular shiftwork type schedules.

Adequate Sleep for Transportation Professionals
It’s been a pleasure in my office to help transportation professionals get healthy, natural sleep. This is primarily about strategically using our body’s sleep systems to promote alertness during work hours and sleep during sleep times.

First, create a window of time for sleep that can be as consistent as possible. Also put into place a routine of meal times, exercise, activity – all those things that signal time to the body. Second, reduce the commute as much as possible. Third, use precisely timed melatonin and light therapy to promote sleep at sleep times and increase alertness during the work day. This is a very individualized approach which takes into account the irregular work schedule, commute time, sleep environment, and lifestyle.

Summary

“The margin of error in these professions is extremely small. Transportation professionals need to manage sleep to perform at their best,” said David Cloud, leader of the National Sleep Foundation.  His comment really sums this up, that sleep health is so important for transportation professionals and the safety of the public they serve.

 You can read the report here: http://www.sleepfoundation.org//article/press-release/sleepy-pilots-train-operators-and-drivers

Time to Help Teens Sleep

February 16, 2012

Teen Sleep

Do you remember dragging yourself out of bed for high school, then struggling to stay awake during class?  You were not alone in this.  Physiologically, teens are set to go to sleep later, and get up later.  Unfortunately school start times require that students be alert and functioning before their bodies are awake.  The good news is that a national movement to start schools later is gathering momentum, and you can join in!

Teen Body Clocks

As part of puberty, the circadian rhythm or ‘body clock’ shifts later.  Research in the last couple years has shown that this shift to later hours happens early in puberty, before other changes may appear.  Decades ago it was thought teens’ late hours were because they enjoyed late-night socializing or sadly some teens were called ‘lazy’ because they slept late.  We now know these sleep hours are based on their physiology. 

This shift can contribute to teens being sleep deprived in that they aren’t able to go to sleep earlier in the night because they aren’t sleepy, but yet they have to get up at a time they are sleeping well to go to school.  Research shows 80% of high school students are significantly sleep deprived, that’s a higher percentage than adults!

Help your Teen get Adequate Sleep

First, figure out how much sleep your teenager needs each night. It might help to remember a vacation when s/he was sleeping on their own schedule and was rested & energetic during the day. Next, plan to get up at the latest time for school, and count backwards to determine the bedtime that allows enough sleep. If it is not possible to go to bed at that time during the week, allow extra time for sleep on weekends.

Sometimes teens aren’t able to fall asleep even when they are in bed at a reasonable time. This is because their body clock is shifted later. They may need medical help to shift their body clock earlier.

Help Change Teens Sleep Nationally

In the last several months an effort to Start School Later has grown. There is a national petition to legislate that schools not start before 8am. This will be presented to Congress during National Sleep Awareness Week, March 5-11. Please join this effort to improve the teen sleep and the entire teen experience by signing this today (it will take 2 minutes). My hope is that we can change generations of teen experience of highschool and that time of life.

Sign the petition today!http://signon.org/sign/promote-legislation-to.fb1?source=s.fb&r_by=1521139


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