Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ category

Great video on Sleep Deprivation

April 3, 2014

Over the years I’ve written a lot about sleep deprivation and it’s effects.  Primarily because Behaviorally Induced Insufficient Sleep ie, chronic partial sleep deprivation, is the most common sleep problem, affecting 47% of adults in America.

Right now I’m working with a group of shift workers to help them create a lifestyle that promotes healthy sleep on work nights and days off, and optimal alertness when awake.  People can be very motivated to work nights because of the increased pay, and often shorter work week because of longer, 12 hour shifts.  But trying to sleep during the day is hard, and often shift workers are sleep deprived.  To help them stay motivated to get enough sleep, I’ve been teaching them about the negative impact of sleep deprivation.  This excellent youtube video about “25 scary and surprising effects of sleep deprivation” by List25 tells it well.  Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbJxLITdt_E

 

Start School Later meets with the Dept. of Health

July 17, 2012

Tomorrow, July 18, the leaders of the national Start School Later initiative will be meeting with directors at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the Department of Health. There is a connection between early school start times and depression and suicidal thoughts that needs to be addressed.

The full press release is below, and I’ll post the update from the meeting in the next few days. If you’d like to weigh in with your support of later school start times you can sign the petition at http://www.startschoollater.net
RELEASE: July 16, 2012: GRASSROOTS GROUP ASKS FEDERAL AGENCY TO ADDRESS LINK BETWEEN EARLY HIGH SCHOOL START TIMES, MENTAL HEALTH, AND TEEN SUICIDES:

Contact: Heather Macintosh, 410-279-4569 heathermac@verizon.net
Dr. Terra Ziporyn Snider, Co-Director, 410-262-6616

Start School Later, a national coalition advocating for sane, humane high school start times, is meeting with Dr. Anne Mathews-Younes, Director of the Division of Prevention, Traumatic Stress and Special Programs, and Dr. Richard McKeon, Director of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), an agency of the US Dept of Health and Human Services (HHS), Wednesday, July 18, in Rockville, MD.

Compelling scientific research shows that adolescents’ sleep needs are being dangerously compromised by the extremely early school schedules of many US high schools. Waking at 5:30 to catch a bus and begin school in the 7 o’clock hour is incompatible with adolescent sleep needs and causing teens to miss out on the crucial sleep they need for physical and mental health and development and optimum academic achievement. Sleep deprivation is strongly linked to anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation, among other health effects.

SAMHSA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which, in turn, is increasingly recognizing the importance sleep plays in the health and wellness of young people.

“We’re looking forward to discussing ways federal agencies might be helpful in raising awareness and facilitating policies to ensure safe, healthy school hours for all children,” says Terra Ziporyn Snider, PhD, Start School Later’s Co-Director. “This has been impossible to achieve in many local school systems, where all too often politics and myth trump student health and well-being.”

Start School Later is an all-volunteer, national coalition working to ensure that all public schools can set hours compatible with health, safety, equity, and learning. Coalition members attending the SAMHSA meeting include Dr. Terra Ziporyn Snider and Kari Oakes, PA-C, both from Maryland, as well as Terry Cralle, RN, of Virginia, and Debbie Coleman, MBA, faculty member at the Miami University (Ohio).

Start School Later – Contact your Senators!

April 20, 2012

Thanks to Terra Snider, Kari Oakes, and Mary King for delivering the Start School Later petition to our Washington State Senators Murry and Cantwell in person on Weds, April 18. This team is committing many hours to speak with congress people from around the country on this important issue. Now is the time for each of us to reach out and voice our support of this initiative with our state congress people. Please do so today!

Senator Patty Murray
448 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-2621
Fax: 202-224-0238
Toll Free: 866-481-9186
Email: Web Form: http://www.murray.senate.gov/email/index.cfm

Senator Maria Cantwell
311 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3441
Fax: 202-228-514
Toll Free: 888-648-7328
Email: HTTP://Cantwell.senate.gov

For those of you reading this in other states, you can learn more about this initiative at http://www.startschoollater.net. There is a tool to find the congress people for your zip code here: http://independenceave.org/. Please contact them now, as the Start School Later team is systematically contacting all the Congress and House of Representatives. Together we can make this important improvement for thousands of teens!

Start School Later goes to Washington DC

March 5, 2012

Over the last week the efforts for the national Start School Later initiative have been intense. This week, March 7th, this petition will be presented to Congress. You can see the press release copied below.

SUPPORT BY SIGNING PETITION NOW at http://signon.org/sign/promote-legislation-to.fb1?source=s.fb&r_by=1521139

400 more signatures are needed as of this moment. I support this initiative in part because many of my adult insomnia patients say that their sleep problems began as a teen, and I’d like to prevent that in the next generation. Thank you, Catherine

Grassroots Petition to Start School Later Goes to Washington for Sleep Week
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 1, 2012

CONTACTS
Annapolis, MD- Terra Ziporyn Snider, Ph.D., StartSchoolLater1@gmail.com 410-975-9759
Seattle, WA- Catherine Darley, ND, drdarley@naturalsleepmedicine.net, 206-293-2899

Annapolis, MD. To honor National Sleep Awareness Week, a grassroots coalition of parents, teachers, and health professionals will begin delivering a petition advocating a minimum school start time of 8 a.m. to Congress and White House officials on Wednesday, March 7, 2012. The petition, garnering national attention, has signatures from all 50 states and Washington, DC and has fueled activity in local communities from Short Hills, NJ to Woodinville, WA.
“Most U.S. high schools today start in the 7 a.m. hour, a practice that began several decades ago primarily to save money on bus runs,” explains Terra Ziporyn Snider, Ph.D., a medical writer and the petition creator from Maryland who is also the mother of three. After more than a decade of work advocating for later start times in her local school system, Snider recounts, “Although evidence is crystal clear that starting later is best for health and learning, political obstacles and myths have made change virtually impossible in most districts.”
The petition effort has galvanized a national coalition of health professionals, sleep researchers, educators, parents, and other concerned citizens called Start School Later. The coalition has representation from 16 states and includes an advisory board comprised of notable sleep researchers, adolescent health care providers, and education leaders.
Voluminous research indicates that later school start time can lead to:
• Reduced sleep deprivation, depression, mood swings, and suicidal ideation
• Decreased stimulant abuse, weight gain, and diabetes risk
• Reduced early morning traffic accidents and drowsy driving by new teen drivers
• Improved safety by eliminating waiting or walking in dark, low visibility settings
• Reduced risky after-school behaviors in unsupervised adolescents
• Reduced truancy and absenteeism, and improve school performance
• Improved lifetime earnings potential, according to a recent study published by the Brookings Institute
Locally, in Washington state about 375people have signed this national petition.
###
Signature totals and comments from Start School Later’s campaign: http://signon.org/sign/promote-legislation-to.fb1?source=s.fb&r_by=1521139

For more information on Start School Later: http://www.startschoollater.net/
Start School Later is a coalition of health professionals, sleep scientists, educators, parents, students, and other concerned citizens dedicated to increasing public awareness about the relationship between sleep and school hours and to ensuring school start times compatible with health, safety, education, and equity.

Time to Help Teens Sleep

February 16, 2012

Teen Sleep

Do you remember dragging yourself out of bed for high school, then struggling to stay awake during class?  You were not alone in this.  Physiologically, teens are set to go to sleep later, and get up later.  Unfortunately school start times require that students be alert and functioning before their bodies are awake.  The good news is that a national movement to start schools later is gathering momentum, and you can join in!

Teen Body Clocks

As part of puberty, the circadian rhythm or ‘body clock’ shifts later.  Research in the last couple years has shown that this shift to later hours happens early in puberty, before other changes may appear.  Decades ago it was thought teens’ late hours were because they enjoyed late-night socializing or sadly some teens were called ‘lazy’ because they slept late.  We now know these sleep hours are based on their physiology. 

This shift can contribute to teens being sleep deprived in that they aren’t able to go to sleep earlier in the night because they aren’t sleepy, but yet they have to get up at a time they are sleeping well to go to school.  Research shows 80% of high school students are significantly sleep deprived, that’s a higher percentage than adults!

Help your Teen get Adequate Sleep

First, figure out how much sleep your teenager needs each night. It might help to remember a vacation when s/he was sleeping on their own schedule and was rested & energetic during the day. Next, plan to get up at the latest time for school, and count backwards to determine the bedtime that allows enough sleep. If it is not possible to go to bed at that time during the week, allow extra time for sleep on weekends.

Sometimes teens aren’t able to fall asleep even when they are in bed at a reasonable time. This is because their body clock is shifted later. They may need medical help to shift their body clock earlier.

Help Change Teens Sleep Nationally

In the last several months an effort to Start School Later has grown. There is a national petition to legislate that schools not start before 8am. This will be presented to Congress during National Sleep Awareness Week, March 5-11. Please join this effort to improve the teen sleep and the entire teen experience by signing this today (it will take 2 minutes). My hope is that we can change generations of teen experience of highschool and that time of life.

Sign the petition today!http://signon.org/sign/promote-legislation-to.fb1?source=s.fb&r_by=1521139

Grandma Died . . . I Can’t Sleep

January 30, 2012

Sadly, my special grandma died Friday night. I will miss her, and remember all the great times we had, and the things she taught me over the years.

Having learned on Saturday morning about her passing, it was on my mind as I settled in to sleep Saturday night. My thoughts were on Grandma, flitting from one memory to another, I was upset. So it took a long time to fall asleep, then I was in and out of sleep through the night, disturbed by the high winds, thinking about the next days’ activities, and even wondering what time it was, if it was time to get up.

This was acute insomnia, which is really typical when people have some type of life-event. Fortunately, I have a long history of robust sleep, so this one night won’t throw me off. On the other hand, for people who have recovered from chronic insomnia, even an understandable acute insomnia in response to an identified stressor can bring up worries about their sleep. That worry about sleep makes sleep more elusive, and can trigger another episode of chronic insomnia.

So what to do? First of all, if an identifiable life-event has happened, keep in mind that it is normal for sleep to be disturbed as we are processing our emotions. As best you can, take time each day to sit and reflect on your experience, allow your emotions to come up, and express them either to a friend, by journaling, or other way. Do this during the day, at least 2 hours before bed, and then in the night tell yourself “I’ll have time to think about this more tomorrow, now is time to rest.” Second of all, don’t begin to worry about your sleep, knowing that as you recover from the event, your sleep will improve. During this emotional time, keep in place all those healthy sleep habits mentioned in other posts – regular bedtime and wake routine, getting out of bed if awake long in the night, saving the bed just for sleep, regular exercise, etc.

Use these strategies. If a time comes that you are no longer feeling emotionally charged about the event, but your sleep is still disturbed, then it is time to get sleep help.

Teen Sleep

September 18, 2011

Remember your sleep in high school? Staying up late, then sleeping late on weekends is what lots of people remember. Unfortunately, another common memory is struggling to get out of bed for school.

It all happens because during puberty, our intrinsic body clock shifts later. Our body clock sets the rhythms in many of our systems, from when our melatonin and cortisol peak, to when we are most mentally sharp and physically coordinated. New research has shown that this swing to later timing is actually one of the first things that happen in puberty, even before physical changes can be observed.

Impact of teens sleep

The difficulty comes when teens (and tweens) need to be on an earlier schedule than their body is programmed for. When school starts early, students are in class, trying to pay attention and learn while their body and mind are asleep. Challenging, eh? Teens’ sleep basically gets squeezed between their later body clocks, and their early schedules. When high school start times were moved on hour later in Minnesota, there was an increase in amount of nightly sleep and subsequent improvement in school success: with improved attendance and most importantly increased graduation rates.

Other studies have looked at the amount of sleep teens get and many health parameters. Teens who get less sleep are:

Less motivated to exercise, contributing to the epidemic in childhood obesity
Get lower grades
Are more depressed
Many other negative effects
How to improve student sleep

The basic principle is to sleep and wake in accordance with the intrinsic body clock. So first of all, honor that teens are on a later schedule, and then set routines that help them be on as early as possible.

Avoid scheduling early morning activities when possible. Advocate for your children when parents and coaches are scheduling events.
Set a sleep / wake schedule, and stick with it.
Get bright light, preferably outdoor light, soon after waking each morning. This is most important in setting the body clock.
Sometimes these measures won’t have a big enough impact. There are medical interventions that can help teens sleep and wake on their early school schedule.

Natural Solutions for Chronic Insomnia

September 2, 2011

It is a common experience to have some transient sleep disturbanceses with life’s challenges. However, for some people this becomes a chronic problem. Although pharmaceutical sleep aides can provide short term relief, natural medicine is needed to treat the cause so the patient is able to sleep well on their own. This talk will discuss the various causes of chronic insomnia, and behavioral, nutritional and other natural solutions.

This month I’ll be speaking for The Greater Seattle Integrative Medicine Group which includes holistic MDs, NDs, Lac, nutritionists, counselors and body workers.  Please join us.

Date: Thursday, September 15, 6 pm to 8:30 pm
Location: Swedish Cultural Center, 1920 Dexter Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
Cost: $15
CEUs for NDs = 1.5
RSVP: IntegrativeMedGroup@yahoo.com

Understanding Circadian Rhythms at the Molecular Level

March 16, 2011

We’ve talked in the past about circadian rhythms, how there is a daily rhythm of hormone fluctuations that make us more alert during the day, and more sleepy during the night. There are also changes in organ function by time of day. Shiftworkers’ health suffers for being up and active at a time their body is programmed to sleep.

What we haven’t discussed is how these rhythms are established in the first place. Just this week, there was an article published in Science by Lazar and Feng about the circadian rhythm of fat metabolism in the liver.

During the day, molecules modify the liver DNA to reduce fat production. Those molecules leave during the night (so there are 100 at 5am, as opposed to 15000 at 5pm). With those molecules absent, more fat is produced and stored in the liver. The authors conclude “This leads to a circadian rhythm of metabolism that is important, because disruption of this rhythm leads to fatty liver. This may explain in part why altered circadian rhythms in people who do shift work is associated with metabolic disorders.”

There are molecular changes like this happening in many organ systems, multiplying the effect of being out of sync with the natural light-dark cycle.  As our understanding of circadian physiology develops, we’ll be better able to improve the health of shiftworkers.

Teens Bedtimes Influence Depression

February 9, 2011

So, we’ve known for a long time that there’s a connection between sleep disturbance and mental health, particularly depression.

There’s been some research published this year looking at the connection between teens’ bedtime and mental health. Because depression may affect a student’s chosen bedtime, this study looked at parentally set bedtimes. Students’ were divided into two groups – bedtime 10pm or before, and bedtime midnight or later.

The teens with the later set bedtime of midnight or after were 24% more likely to be depressed and 20% more likely to have suicidal thoughts. The students with depression and suicidal thoughts had a sleep duration of 7 hr 23 mins compared to the other adolescents with an average of 7 hr 55 mins sleep nightly. Note for all groups this is at least an hour less than the recommended sleep for teens – 9 hours of more.

The authors conclude that an earlier parentally set bedtime may be protective against depression and suicidal thoughts in teens since it provides a longer sleep duration. Something to think about for all parents and people working with kids.


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